Health, Parenting, Personal

Let Sleeping Babies Wake

The other day, I was really saddened to hear the mother of a baby giving thanks for the fact that her child had slept for ten hours straight. She was delighted that – with a little bit of ‘professional’ help from a soi-disant sleep nanny – her baby hadn’t disturbed her all night. This woman was bemoaning that her life was different since her baby had arrived.

 

Well, newsflash! Babies are supposed to change your life. If they don’t, you’re doing it wrong.

 

I am fed up of hearing people talk about their babies as if they (the babies) were evil little demons trying to rob them of sleep or peace or ‘me’ time. If you have made the decision to have a baby, it is up to you to change your life to fit in with the baby – not the other way around. And that isn’t as hard as it might sound; most babies are extremely accommodating and won’t put too much of a stop to your gallop. I’ve brought mine to work; I’ve taken them for trips in trains,  planes and boats; taken them to the cinema, the doctor, the dentist, lunches, brunches, dinners, launches  and anywhere else I might have to go. They’re very portable, I find.

 

But let me get back to the sleeping thing because I actually meant this post more as a public service announcement than a rant. (No, really!). It’s actually dangerous to have your babies sleeping away from you. The fad for having babies sleep away from their mothers is a fairly recent – and a fairly Western – one.

 

With this separation of baby from parent/s, began the rise of SIDS.  In Africa and Asia, children sleep with their parent/s for at least the first two years (in some places, even the first five years) of life. Cot-death is unheard of.  There is more on that here and in Meredith Small’s book ‘Our Babies Ourselves’ .

 

But, quite apart from the science and the evidence – let’s be practical about this.  I am a great proponent of lazy parenting. I am far too lazy to get out of my bed in the middle of the night and wander around a dark house into another room to pluck a crying baby from her cot before feeding her (or comforting her if she doesn’t need a feed), putting her back in her cot and stumbling, bleary-eyed, back to my own bed. I love my sleep too much. So my babies slept with me and found the breast as and when they needed it. (That didn’t work so well with my eldest, who was early born and unable to suck.  I expressed and fed her every hour for the first few months, then every two hours. I kept her in the bed with me, though.  It was still easier to feed her that way.)

 

Apart from when they were sick, I never had a broken night’s sleep when my children were babies. I expect they’ll come – along with the ten-hour sleeps  – when they’re teenagers.

 

 

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